Recode: Apple Considering $400 Price Tag for Wearable

Dawn Chmielewski and John Paczkowski, reporting for Recode:

Apple executives have discussed charging around $400 for the company’s new wearable device.

Pricing has yet to be finalized for the forthcoming product, which is expected to begin shipping next year. Sources say consumers should expect a range of prices for different models including lower priced versions.

I’d pay $400 for an iWatch, depending on its functionality and fashion appeal.

Gizmodo Invited By Apple to September 9 Event

Brian Barrett, writing for Gizmodo:

Apple has just sent out its invitations to an event on September 9th. You can expect at least one iPhone, and possibly an iWatch as well. And hey… we’ll be there!

Off the shitlist, indeed.

(via Daring Fireball)

‘Look Daddy! Santa Gave Me An iWatch Raincheck’

John Paczkowski reports for Recode that Apple’s wearable device isn’t shipping soon:

So that new wearable device Apple is introducing on September 9? It’s going to be a while before anyone is actually wearing it. Sources in position to know tell me it won’t arrive at market for a few months. “It’s not shipping anytime soon,” said one. So when does Apple plan to ship its eagerly anticipated wearable? That’s not clear, but my understanding is that we’re unlikely to see it at retail until after the holiday season — think early 2015.

Read more...

‘The $15,000 Video Setup in Your Hand’

Cliff Kuang, in a profile for Wired on Instagram’s new app, Hyperlapse:

By day, Thomas Dimson quietly works on Instagram’s data, trying to understand how people connect and spread content using the service. Like a lot of people working at the company, he’s also a photo and movie geek—and one of his longest-held affections has been for Baraka, an art-house ode to humanity that features epic tracking shots of peoples all across the world. “It was my senior year, and my friend who was an architect said, ‘You have to see it, it will blow you away,’” says Dimson. He wasn’t entirely convinced. The movie, after all, was famous for lacking any narration or plot. But watching the film in his basement, Dimson was awestruck. “Ever since, it’s always been the back of my mind,” he says.

Read more...

‘iOS First. Android Much, Much Later.’

Semil Shah, on mobile startups and devoting development time:

The most common trap here is the early iOS app which gets some buzz. All of a sudden, the founders hear “When are you building for Android?” The natural, enthusiastic response to sincere requests of the Android chorus is to go ahead and build for Android and seek more downloads, more growth, more revenue. I have a different view though. The proper response is: “No. Buy an iPhone.”

Read more...

‘Why We’re Not Driving the Friendly Skies’

Stuart F. Brown, writing for the New York Times:

Trying to reconcile the conflicting requirements of the two types of vehicles invariably results in a boatload of compromises that, some say, make the flying car a nonstarter. Yet the dream lives on.

[...]

Enthusiasts have a think or two coming if they assume that one need only buy a flying car and point the nose skyward to soar above the dreary highways. Nobody gets off the ground without training and a pilot’s license, and no government agency will sign off on citizens’ routinely taking off and landing on public roads. That’s what airports are for.

Read more...

On iMessage Spam

Marco Tabini, writing for Macworld:

Is Apple’s iMessage the new favorite tool of spammers worldwide? A widely-quoted recent article written by Wired’s Robert McMillan suggests it is, even going so far as to claim that iMessage “is being taken over by spammers.”

Largely based on an interview with security analyst Tom Landesman, McMillan states that, thanks to a few enterprising fraudsters who have figured out a way to take advantage of Apple’s networks, iMessage accounts for some 30 percent of all mobile spam, and that the company’s efforts at stemming the onslaught of unwanted messages are moving too slowly to catch up with the spammers.

Read more...

Regarding Twitter Tweaking Users’ Timelines

Stephen Hackett, in response to Twitter’s decision to tweak users’ timelines with popular tweets:

My Twitter timeline is relevant and interesting to me because I set it up. Twitter’s genius is that people can build their own experiences; I don’t want an algorithm made by a hipster developer interfering with that.

One more reason to not use Twitter’s official app, despite the cool new stuff they’re experimenting with.

Read more...

On #Ferguson

David Carr, writing for the New York Times:

For people in the news business, Twitter was initially viewed as one more way to promote and distribute content. But as the world has become an ever more complicated place — a collision of Ebola, war in Iraq, crisis in Ukraine and more — Twitter has become an early warning service for news organizations, a way to see into stories even when they don’t have significant reporting assets on the ground. And in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.

Read more...

‘The Most Fascinating Profile You’ll Ever Read About a Guy and His Boring Startup’

Mat Honan for Wired, in a good profile of Slack founder Stewart Butterfield:

Slack is so beloved that some companies have begun mentioning it as an employment perk alongside on-site massages and bottomless bacon-tray Fridays in their job listings. Like: We have a dry cleaning service, an ice cream parlor, and… Slack.

We at Constellation.fm have used Slack for a while now, and it’s great.

(via Daring Fireball)